Casino Royale Tv James Bond 007 auf DVD

James Bond Casino Royale: Sendetermine · Streams · DVDs · Cast & Crew. gefeierten Höhepunkt hatte – voraussichtliche TV-Premiere im ZDF. Infos · Episodenguide · SendetermineTV-Termine · alle Sender · SRF 1 (Schweiz) · SRF zwei (Schweiz) · Cast & Crew · DVD & Blu-ray · DVDs · Blu-rays · CDs. Tv-sendung James-bondcasino-royale | Finden Sie einfach die besten Sendungen im TV-Programm heute. Ihr Fernsehprogramm auf einen Blick. Dezember , Uhr) als Geheimagent Ihrer Majestät und alle vier Bonds mit seinem Nachfolger Daniel Craig: "James Bond - Casino Royale". Wir sind eine Kreativ- und Produktionsmanufaktur in Berlin. Casino Royale entwickelt Content für Brands, TV-Sender, Streamingdienste und Audioplattformen.

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Dezember , Uhr) als Geheimagent Ihrer Majestät und alle vier Bonds mit seinem Nachfolger Daniel Craig: "James Bond - Casino Royale". Mit den TV-Ausstrahlungen von RTL ist es nun sehr einfach möglich, die bisherigen Craig-Abenteuer (noch einmal) zu schauen – zumindest. Geschüttelt oder gerührt? Von Tom Ruder. Operation geglückt: "Casino Royale" mit Daniel Craig als "neuem Bond", funktionierte als glaubwürdige.

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CHIP GRATIS GAMES Meine ich ja. Zum ersten Mal wird der finale Film eines Farmer Spiel auch ein wirklicher Abschluss seiner persönlichen Reihe, der Handlungselemente aus allen vorherigen Filmen noch einmal aufgreifen wird. Ekz Wust kann die Einwilligung jederzeit per E-Mail an kontakt imfernsehen. Diese Schauspieler waren einmal zusammen.
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Casino Royale Tv Eine Verfilmung für die ganze Familie. Bei einem Kauf über diese Links erhalten wir eine Provision. Beliebte News. Nanny Spiele von vorgestern Diese Schauspieler waren einmal zusammen Jetzt lesen. Preisstand: Er ist vom "Killerwal" Willy fasziniert und will Oddset Ergebnisse Aktuell zur Freiheit verhelfen.

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You don't review James Bond movies, you evaluate them, rate them according to how well they meet expectations. There are certain things one has come to expect, even demand of a Bond film and each individual effort either delivers or it doesn't.

Okay, okay, this is not really a James Bond movie, but it is part of the Bond legend, so what the heck: Here are ten elements that make a Bond film a Bond film and how "Climax!

Pre-credits teaser: In the thrilling, nail-biting intro, "Climax! So, no one jumps out of a plane or skydives off a cliff or even gets killed -- but, at least, Lundigan is, well, a nice looking man.

But he's not much of a card player, as he deals the cards by tossing them on the floor. I don't think that is according to Hoyle.

Opening credits: We don't get the legendary "gun barrel" opening that would become a Bond trademark, but ironically the opening credits are shown over a zoom into a similarly round camera lens.

And after being informed that Act I is about to begin, an unseen -- and obviously inept -- gunman either tries to shoot Bond or is just trying to assassinate a stone column in front of the Casino Royale.

Either way, he misses Bond by a mile. This is the only thing in the entire film that comes close to an action-packed, special effects sequence.

Theme song: No real music, just some vamping with a canned intro tune and a tad of Chopin later in the background. There really isn't much music at all in the film, giving the show that hollow, empty sound that is typical of live TV drama.

Apparently this casino can't even afford Muzak. He dominates the baccarat table of Casino Royale with all the self-assurance of a man who is afraid his wife will find out that he is risking the rent money at "Casino Night" at the local Presbyterian Church fundraiser.

Nelson isn't very suave and quite frankly could have introduced himself as "Bland, James Bland. Bond Babes: Dressed to the nines, like June Cleaver all gussied up for the Country Club dance, Linda Christian is quite the epitome of 's fashion -- furs and pearls and everything.

She doesn't show much skin, just that little hint of cleavage, but as the world's first Bond Girl she is certainly ritzy eye candy. As an actress, she is far less interesting.

Bond Villain: Peter Lorre made a career of being creepy and even in his later years his infrequent bit roles in minor horror movies had a comically bittersweet quality.

Here however, despite playing LeChiffre, allegedly one of the most dangerous men that the Soviets have, he just makes you a little bit sad. Looking tired and indifferent, you get the feeling that what he wants most is to sit down and catch his breath.

Bond Baddies: His trio of "bodyguards" look like refugees from a morticians convention. They don't look so much deadly, as just dead-like.

One of them does have a cane that is really a gun, which is the nearest thing the show has to a neat gadget.

Sinister Plot: The plot is not all that different from the other versions: Bond must bankrupt the Soviet's treasury by beating LeChiffre in a high-stakes game of baccarat.

The card match itself is high stakes gambling, but penny-ante drama. Production values: Actually, this might pass for a big-budget production by live-TV standards of the 's, but like the quality of the grainy, black-and-white kinescope it was preserved on, it hasn't aged well.

The sets are cheaply decorated to look faux classy, but all the rooms seem to be remarkably tiny, allowing for little imagination as far as the camera work.

To say it looks primitive is to be overtly kind. Bonus Points: Let's toss in 5 extra points just for reminding us that the so-called "Golden Age of Television" wasn't always that golden.

For every "Requiem for a Heavyweight" by Rod Serling or a "Marty" by Paddy Chayefsky, there were plenty of clunky time-fillers like this.

And though screenwriters Charles Bennett and Anthony Ellis do try to capture the wit and charm of Bond, they also give us lines like this: "Aren't you the fellow who was shot?

Even Austin Powers would avoid dialogue like that. Summary: Watching this humble production, it is unlikely anyone could have foretold the way the Bond legacy would have prospered into a multi-billion dollar entity.

It is a must-see for Bond fanatics and pop culture historians, but only a odd curiosity piece for all others.

Bond-o-meter Rating: 45 points out of This was a surprisingly accurate adaptation of part of Fleming's novel and is the debut of Bond on film.

If you're lucky enough to ever see this, you won't really be thinking about that. You'll be like wow, I can't believe I actually got to see this!

A lot has to be forgiven here. First, this is a recording of a live performance - when something went wrong, they were stuck with it; and since this is cheaply made, they had little rehearsal time, so a quite a number of things go wrong.

Secondly, the surviving recording is incomplete and not very good. Third, the producers of the show were trying to make the British Ian Fleming's break-out novel accessible to American audiences only familiar with American espionage B-movies, a '50s genre that has not gotten preserved, so most people now will not be familiar with the drab back-alley feel of this show drawn from that genre.

And that the producers felt the need to go this route shows that they themselves really had little understanding of where Fleming was coming from - which was really Somerset Maugham's "Ashenden, or the British Agent," filmed in the early '30s by Alfred Hitchcock.

And really, prime Hitchcock is the director Fleming would have had in mind while writing this book. But despite his popularity, Hitchcock himself remained an anomaly in Hollywood throughout the '50s.

His ability to shock audiences was well known, but his capacity for sophisticated wit and subtle irony were not easy for most Americans to grasp at the time.

So too Fleming's subversive sense of what at last became known as the "anti-hero" - a man as ruthless as his enemies, able to seduce and destroy women with a glance, then quietly order breakfast in a luxury hotel as if nothing happened.

For Fleming, this was a means of preserving the "hard-boiled" detective tradition while at the same time raising uncomfortable questions about what it meant to live comfortably middle-class in cold-war England.

Never pointed enough to threaten middle-class readers, but enough to raise their anxiety level to the point of continued interest in the James Bond series.

There's none of that here - the romance is played straight, and the only sophistication comes in the gambling scene. The rest bulls through or stumbles along as one might expect from an American genre thriller of the time.

The major plus factors here are the performances. Most of the cast is miscast, but performs energetically despite that; Peter Lorre performs very weakly, but he happens to be perfectly cast - he is the definitive Le Chiffre!

That surprising discovery is reason enough to find this show and give it a view, at least for Bond aficionados. While 's "Dr.

No" was the first time James Bond appeared on movie screens, it was actually this television adaptation that the character was first seen at all.

Since this was on American television, though, Bond's nationality was changed so he became Jimmy Bond, a Yank.

Besides this distracting update, the story is very close to Ian Fleming's novel and most of the scenes are lifted directly from their source. Bond is ordered to beat Le Chiffre so that his bosses would eliminate their own agent, causing great embarrassment to the organization.

It's fairly obvious that this was a live made-for-TV movie, with some technical screw-ups showing up here and there and the lack of a lot of different sets.

That being said, the hour long episode moves quickly, with Baccarat being explained for anyone who doesn't understand at the start.

There are also some funny bits, such as when Leiter manages to keep money away from one of Le Chiffre's henchmen. The small cast works well together, even though the acting gets appropriately too theatrical at times for my taste.

Lorre is chilling as Le Chiffre, and fits Fleming's description quite nicely. Michael Pate as Leiter is pretty solid and a believable ally, while Linda Christian is the only weak link in the chain.

So what's the verdict on Barry Nelson, the first James Bond? He's definitely no Sean Connery, but handles himself well before the image of the secret agent was created in the film series.

His relaxed attitude helps to distract from the fact that Bond isn't British here. So even though the ending is a bit too tame Fleming's torture from the book would never have reached TV audiences from , the mini-movie makes up for it with a tense battle at the card table, some good acting, and a great espionage feel throughout.

Any Bond fan should at least try to find this and the average movie goer should do the same, just to see how James Bond's first mission played out.

This is not your typical James Bond movie as we know James Bond today. I purchased it on video cassette and started watching it and was surprised to find a black and white movie in which James Bond is a CIA Agent and his counter part Felix Leiter is a British Secret Service agent.

As far as action goes in this movie, it is a 's style of fights and action, do not expect it to be what you are used to.

For something filmed years ago and seen today it is not the best, but for something of its time period it is a good film. The casino sequences are the majority of the movie.

There are very few scenes set or shot outside the casino in this film. The actors did a good job of portraying the characters and setting the tone for the action to come.

If you are a true James Bond fan then this is a must see movie for you, if not then don't waste your time.

First Appearance of James Bond When Ian Fleming published the first novel, "Casino Royale", in , he envisioned it as being made as a movie, and began 'selling' it to anyone who might be interested.

He quickly struck a deal, but soon discovered that he'd made a bad bargain; once he'd relinquished the rights, not only did he lose any control over how it would be used, or where, but on any potential revenue from it, as well.

He'd be far more cautious in future, but "Casino Royale" became the one 'Bond' title that Eon Productions wouldn't own American television, in the s, was called the "Golden Age" of 'live' drama, in part because recording techniques were so primitive.

Short of actually filming productions, which was costly and time-consuming, the only way of recording was on videotape's predecessor, which was grainy, dark, and really awful.

As a result, much would be performed 'live', with the taping only made as a record of the airing. A lot of plays, stories, and novels were edited into half-hour and hour-long television programs, and "Casino Royale" was adapted, by Charles Bennett and Anthony Ellis, for an episode of the "Climax!

Leiter, etc. The villain's name remained 'Le Chiffre', although his method of torture caning one's genitals in an open-seated rattan chair was 'cleaned up' As Bond, veteran American actor Barry Nelson was smug, confident, and independent, preferring a 'lone hand' to outside interference.

I met Nelson in the early s, and asked if he remembered the production. He said he recalled little of it as the production was 'live' and he was very busy in a variety of projects , but that, he recalled, Peter Lorre, as Le Chiffre, had trouble remembering his lines, and ad-libbed a lot.

Within television's limitations, the basic plot of Bond beating an enemy agent at the gambling tables to prevent him from recouping 'lost' espionage funds is pretty faithful to the novel which was based on Fleming's own wartime experiences.

Despite this, the production is stagy with only two sets , rife with missed cues and flubs, and overripe performances. Lorre does make a good villain, however, certainly better than some of the later film ones!

All in all, the production offers novelty value, and little else Early TV movie adaptation of 'Casino Royale' has the low key feeling of the original novel.

The low budget both helps the movie and hinders it: it gives it the grittier look that some of the Bond novels have, and also makes it look slightly like a film noir, but also limits it in term of sets and props and lighting which is often times visible over the actors' heads.

The short run time is also a mixed bag: the film doesn't overstay its welcome, and follows the book fairly closely, the original novel was so short that it seems almost like a pamphlet, rather than a full length novel but it doesn't give much opportunity to flesh out the characters at all.

Peter Lorre is good as LeChiffre, and Michael Pate as Leiter or "Letter" as he's listed in the end credits is very likable, and perhaps would have made a better choice to play Bond here, but Barry Nelson was mediocre.

If he would have been more familiar with the character and not been doing a Humphrey Bogart impersonation, he might have been good. He does fairly well when he's intensely grilling Valerie Mathis about the microphone LeChiffre planted in Bond's room, and he's adequate in the casino sequences, but falls flat during the climactic scenes.

This TV-movie is also marred by the fact that the love interest between Bond and the lead girl is almost completely overlooked here, as is Bond's contemplation of resignation and his subsequent double-cross by the girl; basically the entire fourth!

Maybe if it would have had a longer running time, and if the censors would have allowed it, they could have fleshed out some of these omitted story elements?

One of the villain's henchmen has a cane which doubles as a gun, which is a good touch; this particular scene follows the book closely, and is one of the better scenes in this film.

JonTheGod 23 June This film is a bit of an oddity. A rare little gem, bringing James Bond to the screen for the first time.

One of the closest adaptations of Ian Fleming's works. Peter Lorre - very good villain. Making Bond a Yank. Americans seem to have this need to take credit away from the Brits for everything Don't even get me started on U They made Felix Leiter a Brit and renamed him Clarence.

Anyway, gripes aside it IS worth seeking out if you're a fan. It's available in 2 versions as far as I am aware. The version I have is about an hour long, but there are rumours of a longer version which continues from where the other left off in which the villain returns from the dead to carry on the fight a bit more.

Jimmy Bond. Louis L'Amour on Film and Television. United Artists: the company that changed the film industry.

Univ of Wisconsin Press. Kiss Kiss Bang! Batsford Books. The James Bond Bedside Companion. London: Boxtree Ltd.

University of Nebraska Press. Spy television 2 ed. Greenwood Publishing Group. James Bond: The Legacy Harry N. Manchester University Press.

Ian Fleming. London: Phoenix. For Yours Eyes Only. London: Bloomsbury Publishing. London: Jonathan Cape. The Essential Bond. The James Bond films: a behind the scenes history.

Westport, Conn: Arlington House. Ian Fleming 's James Bond. Distributie Casino Royale. Distribuitorul international Sony Pictures Releasing International.

Site oficial Casino Royale. StefanDo pe 18 Martie Film asteptat din foarte multe motive: revenire a regizorului Martin Campbell autor si al apreciatului Goldeneye , primul roman al seriei lui Ian Fleming, un actor principal hulit de toti si cu toate acestea ales sa-l joace pe celebrul spion, lipsa gadget-urilor si a lui Q.

Toate acestea promiteau un Bond atipic, lucru destul de interesant mai ales ca niciodata n-am inteles de ce se isterizeaza lumea din cauza unui barbat de 40 de ani care se chinuie sa dovedeasca tutoror ca este cel mai tare in situatii suspect de neverosimile.

Dar Bond 21 sau Casino Royale a fost o supriza placuta, iar Daniel Craig este principalul ingredient al succesului filmului.

Pierce Brosnan mi-a placut si el, dar era un actor si-atat si un spion si-atat. Imi aduc aminte de isteria creata la aflarea vestii ca Pierce Brosnan va fi inlocuit de Daniel Craig.

Exista chiar si un site unde puteai vota impotriva sau pentru acesta mutare. Autorii site-ului promiteau ca voturile vor ajunge pe masa producatorilor sau ceva de genul Dar am fost placut surprins de prestatia lui.

Printre cei mai convingatori actori in rolul agentului , dupa Sean Connery. Eva Braun, una din actritele mele preferate, reuseste sa il completeze foarte bine pe Daniel Craig in rol de Bond Girl.

Filmul are prospetime, intriga iar situatiile create aduc acea nota de credibilitate pierduta in ultimele filme din serie. S-a dus eroul suav si cizelat care era James Bond in precedentele sale iesiri pe ecran, preocupat sa nu-si sifoneze costumul in timp ce salva lumea de megalomanii sai adversari si folosind tot felul de gadget-uri ultrasofisticate conceptul de product placement s-a dezvoltat practic cu franciza.

La fel cum Nolan, anul trecut, stergea cu buretele tot ce Burton facuse bine si Schumacher nenorocise in materie de Batman, tot asa Martin Campbell care mai are un reviriment al seriei Bond la activ cu Goldeneye reviziteaza creatia lui Ian Fleming , iar liftingul ii iese cu mult mai mult succes.

Frumos comentariu Oircum , gusturile nu se discuta. Teodorescu pe 10 iunie Data Rating. Button pe 21 Februarie Categoric, cel mai bun film cu James Bond din serie.

Ceea ce face ca acest film sa fie asa de bun este realismul care lipseste aproape in totallitate din celelalte filme cu agentul !

Crist11 pe 31 iulie Pepe pe 01 Decembrie De rahat :- Celor care lauda "realismul" acestui Bond de doi bani, le-as spune ca Bond e normal sa fie SF, asa a fost destinat, cu masini cu gadgeturi SF, etc.

La fel ca Mision Impossible. Asta e genul, asa s-a consacrat, pentru asta mergem sa-l vedem. Mergem sa ne distram cu scene imposibile, urmariri spectaculoase, femei si barbati frumosi.

Daca vreau un film bun, de arta, in nici un caz nu ma duc la unul cu eticheta , nu-i asa? Daca voi va uitati la filme pentru realism

Geschüttelt oder gerührt? Von Jasmin Herzog. Operation geglückt: "Casino Royale" mit Daniel Craig als "neuem Bond" funktionierte als glaubwürdige​. Geschüttelt oder gerührt? Von Tom Ruder. Operation geglückt: "Casino Royale" mit Daniel Craig als "neuem Bond", funktionierte als glaubwürdige. Der TV-Agententhriller wurde live in der CBS-Show "Climax!" aufgeführt. "​Casino Royale" ist Ian Flemings erster Bond-Roman. Weil der Autor die. James Bond: Casino Royale: Als Bond Nummer 6 muss sich Daniel Craig seinen Doppelnull-Status - Bildergalerie bei TV Spielfilm. Mit den TV-Ausstrahlungen von RTL ist es nun sehr einfach möglich, die bisherigen Craig-Abenteuer (noch einmal) zu schauen – zumindest.

Casino Royale Tv James Bond 007 - Casino Royale

Tipp Ergebnisse Björn Becher — Becher als Autor gelesen habe? Conni hat einen ziemlich strengen Schullehrer, der Toggo Spiele Kostenlos seinem Hund Werbung machen und Geld verdienen will. Weitere Bildergalerien Die 50 besten Filme, Skatstadt Sie noch nicht kennen. Oder sie besser das Schreiben. Ein Kultklassiker! Zurück zum Thema:Avengers ist eine Truppe, mit jeweils eigenen Filmen. Mit den TV-Ausstrahlungen von RTL ist es nun sehr einfach möglich, die bisherigen Craig-Abenteuer noch einmal zu schauen — zumindest, wenn man sich It Came an viel Werbung und einer deutschen Synchronisation stört. Habt ihr den Film bereits gesehen? Schreib einen neuen Kommentareine Rezension oder Erinnerung. Zum ersten Mal wird der Ovo Online Film eines Darstellers auch ein wirklicher Mobil And Fun Erfahrungen seiner persönlichen Reihe, der Handlungselemente aus allen vorherigen Filmen noch einmal aufgreifen wird. Whatever it takes. Und dass man merkte, dass man die Plots der beiden Erstlinge und von Contact Unibet irgendwie zusammenkriegen muss, weil man es dort komplett verpennt hat. Um zu verhindern, dass Le Chiffre noch mehr Attentate finanziert, lässt sich Bond auf ein millionenschweres Poker-Turnier ein, das für Weitere Fantastische Spiele Verlierer nur tödlich enden kann. Die 50 besten Filme, die Sie noch nicht kennen. Bibi Casino 777 Juegos Gratis dabei ihre Hexenkräfte. Sony Pictures Am heutigen Sonntag, den Weitere Bildergalerien Filmperlen. WilsonMichael G. Ihr macht das toll mit der Werbung :- Wegen dem geplanten Kinostart 2. Denn bis der kommt, können wir die bisherigen 4 in Endlosschleife gucken. Von Björn Becher — Weitere Bildergalerien Die 50 besten Filme, die Sie noch nicht kennen. Diese Schauspieler waren einmal zusammen. Als er von ihr nach London geschickt wird, Bremen Vs Frankfurt es ihn wie anders die Menschen in England sind. Hollywood-Paare von vorgestern Diese Schauspieler waren einmal zusammen Jetzt lesen. Bitte anmelden, um Bayer Leverkusen Kaiserslautern zu aktivieren arrow. Casino Royale Tv Maybe if it would have had Sofort Spielen De longer running time, and if the censors would have allowed it, they could have fleshed out some of these omitted story elements? Jimmy Bond. Acting is a hit and a miss; Barry Nelson is easily the worst actor to play Bond in the history of Bond, but he does Sombi Spiele a few unintentionally funny lines. Worst of all, none of these people have any ounce Tipico Tipps presence or charisma. To say it looks primitive is to be overtly kind. Bond Villain: Peter Lorre made a career of being creepy and even in his later years his infrequent bit roles in minor horror movies had a comically bittersweet quality. Falschen oder nicht mehr vorhandenen Stream melden. Ihr macht das toll mit der Werbung :- Wegen dem geplanten Kinostart 2. In Partnerschaft mit Amazon. Diese Benachrichtigungen z. Mein Güte. Diese Kinderfilme für die Casual App Familie laufen am 1. Die 50 besten Filme, die Sie noch nicht kennen. Cursed — Die Auserwählte: Die ersten Bilder.

HD P Attrition Attrition. Confidential Assignment Confidential Assignment. HD P La caza La caza. HD P SuperGrid SuperGrid. Trailer: Casino Royale.

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Lorre does make a good villain, however, certainly better than some of the later film ones! All in all, the production offers novelty value, and little else Looking for something to watch?

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Alternate Versions. Rate This. Season 1 Episode 3. All Episodes American spy James Bond must outsmart card wiz and crime boss Le Chiffre while monitoring his actions.

Director: William H. Brown Jr. Added to Watchlist. High School Icons, Then and Now. Short of actually filming productions, which was costly and time-consuming, the only way of recording was on videotape's predecessor, which was grainy, dark, and really awful.

As a result, much would be performed 'live', with the taping only made as a record of the airing.

A lot of plays, stories, and novels were edited into half-hour and hour-long television programs, and "Casino Royale" was adapted, by Charles Bennett and Anthony Ellis, for an episode of the "Climax!

Leiter, etc. The villain's name remained 'Le Chiffre', although his method of torture caning one's genitals in an open-seated rattan chair was 'cleaned up' As Bond, veteran American actor Barry Nelson was smug, confident, and independent, preferring a 'lone hand' to outside interference.

I met Nelson in the early s, and asked if he remembered the production. He said he recalled little of it as the production was 'live' and he was very busy in a variety of projects , but that, he recalled, Peter Lorre, as Le Chiffre, had trouble remembering his lines, and ad-libbed a lot.

Within television's limitations, the basic plot of Bond beating an enemy agent at the gambling tables to prevent him from recouping 'lost' espionage funds is pretty faithful to the novel which was based on Fleming's own wartime experiences.

Despite this, the production is stagy with only two sets , rife with missed cues and flubs, and overripe performances.

Lorre does make a good villain, however, certainly better than some of the later film ones! All in all, the production offers novelty value, and little else Early TV movie adaptation of 'Casino Royale' has the low key feeling of the original novel.

The low budget both helps the movie and hinders it: it gives it the grittier look that some of the Bond novels have, and also makes it look slightly like a film noir, but also limits it in term of sets and props and lighting which is often times visible over the actors' heads.

The short run time is also a mixed bag: the film doesn't overstay its welcome, and follows the book fairly closely, the original novel was so short that it seems almost like a pamphlet, rather than a full length novel but it doesn't give much opportunity to flesh out the characters at all.

Peter Lorre is good as LeChiffre, and Michael Pate as Leiter or "Letter" as he's listed in the end credits is very likable, and perhaps would have made a better choice to play Bond here, but Barry Nelson was mediocre.

If he would have been more familiar with the character and not been doing a Humphrey Bogart impersonation, he might have been good. He does fairly well when he's intensely grilling Valerie Mathis about the microphone LeChiffre planted in Bond's room, and he's adequate in the casino sequences, but falls flat during the climactic scenes.

This TV-movie is also marred by the fact that the love interest between Bond and the lead girl is almost completely overlooked here, as is Bond's contemplation of resignation and his subsequent double-cross by the girl; basically the entire fourth!

Maybe if it would have had a longer running time, and if the censors would have allowed it, they could have fleshed out some of these omitted story elements?

One of the villain's henchmen has a cane which doubles as a gun, which is a good touch; this particular scene follows the book closely, and is one of the better scenes in this film.

JonTheGod 23 June This film is a bit of an oddity. A rare little gem, bringing James Bond to the screen for the first time. One of the closest adaptations of Ian Fleming's works.

Peter Lorre - very good villain. Making Bond a Yank. Americans seem to have this need to take credit away from the Brits for everything Don't even get me started on U They made Felix Leiter a Brit and renamed him Clarence.

Anyway, gripes aside it IS worth seeking out if you're a fan. It's available in 2 versions as far as I am aware. The version I have is about an hour long, but there are rumours of a longer version which continues from where the other left off in which the villain returns from the dead to carry on the fight a bit more.

Jimmy Bond. Before Sean Connery played Bond in 's big-screen "Dr. He is tasked with cleaning out communist agent Le Chiffre Peter Lorre, "Casablanca" in a game of baccarat.

Le Chiffre has been living like a high-roller on party funds, and if he can't recover the funds quickly, he's likely to be executed by his own party.

He plans to stake everything on one card game at Casino Royale in France. Bond's mission is to make sure Le Chiffre is ruined.

This early Bond film is markedly different from the later MGM series, and criticisms of it arise mainly from comparisons with the wildly popular franchise.

To many, Sean Connery was the only Bond, and later actors were only replacements. Nelson still doesn't benefit by coming before Connery. Nelson plays Bond like a hard-boiled private eye.

He talks with a stiff upper lip and drinks water instead of vodka martinis shaken-not-stirred. Peter Lorre, however, is spot-on as the villain.

Even though he is a small man, he radiates an erratic intensity that makes him menacing. Since this version of "Casino Royale" was made for live TV, there are also mistakes as a result of not having multiple takes to get it right.

There are long pauses in telephone conversations, Lorre is inaudible at times, and in one shot, he clearly didn't know the camera was still on him.

This film probably won't be interesting to a general audience today, but it is a must-see for Bond fanatics. Theo Robertson 11 July We all know Bond is the most successful film franchise in history and we all recognise the icons , the babes , the exotic locations , the gadgets , the big set piece stunts etc of a franchise featuring a very British fictional hero.

Now imagine a James Bond story without any of these icons. Worse than that imagine if he was an American character?

I do apologise I didn't mean to make you faint Some people have said this live American TV production deserves some credit for at least sticking to the plot of the original novel which is not something you can say about the films that started going their own way even before the end of the s.

My own fascination watching this was entirely down to the opposite reason - it's Bond as film noir that shares nothing in common with the film series.

Bond played by Nelson wears a tuxedo and smokes too much but that's the only link you'll recognise. Surviving a murder attempt in the opening scene a policeman refers to it by stating: " They weren't after your winnings then?

They weren't after my autograph either " And that's the closest we get to show stopping one liners as the entire action takes place in a couple of sets shot in a TV studio as Jimmy tries to beat Peter Lorre's villain in a card game On its own this obscure TV drama come thriller would be totally forgotten if it wasn't for the fact that it's the first on screen appearance of someone playing Ian Fleming's James Bond.

In comparison you can see why Bond became an instant legend in the s with the exotic location filming and the sexy and charismatic Sean Connery playing the role with a hard edge.

It was the first time we heard the distinctive opening theme music It was the first time we saw him order The first time we heard a woman moan: "Oh But it was October, , just one year after Ian Fleming's first novel was published.

So what if James Bond didn't hit the ground running? To see the man, okay, played by Norwegian-American Barry Nelson, offer a casual quip after a brush with death, tuxedo unruffled, will stir the heart of any true Bondophile.

Bond Nelson is on the case for Combined Intelligence. To do so, he needs to beat Le Chiffre at baccarat, and not lose his head in the process when his old flame Valerie Mathis Linda Christian is threatened with death.

I had to give this TV movie a ranking here in order to review it, though it's no fair using the same metric as with the theatrical Bonds.

There was no "Take 2" for the cast of 's "Casino Royale", working live and without a net. Shadows are cast over actors' faces. A pasty, bloated Lorre stumbles over many of his lines.

Nelson crams his shoulder into a lampshade. Someone can be overheard coughing behind the camera during a tense interrogation scene.

Nelson, an amiably solid journeyman actor, comports himself well under the circumstances. Once you get used to his accent and flattop haircut, a slight twitchiness in his manner, and people calling him "Card Sense Jimmy Bond", he's easy and interesting to watch, managing to look both cool and concerned while still pulling off a nice Roger Moore-ish quip or two.

Lorre, oddly, is the weak sister in this acting trio, but despite some obvious discomfort he does use his famous screen presence to some good effect, especially in a card-table sequence which is the best part of this short movie where he smirks and glowers to cold effect.

There's also a surprisingly gritty torture sequence at the end, with the bad guys using a pair of pliers on Bond's toes.

The producers of "Climax! Brown couldn't copy the Fleming novel too closely; it had Bond getting punished in a more tender part of his anatomy.

But they do get much of the nub of the story, not a bad feat considering the time limit and production code. The movie I saw ran just 48 minutes. Apparently there was more to the ending that I missed, though it seemed to have run its course well enough.

The last line in my version has Bond saying "Call the police". I don't think you'll hear Bond say that in any of his other movies. Despite or because of such incongruities, "Casino Royale" is a fascinating glimpse at giving birth to a s icon a decade too soon.

As a spy story, it only works in fits and starts, but what matters is its place as the somewhat-neglected beginning of a screen legend.

MartinHafer 9 June If you have never read any of Ian Fleming's James Bond stories, I am sure you'll like this odd television version a lot less that those who have read them.

Gone are the gadgets, sex and style you assume is Bond--none this was in the first book from his series "Casino Royale" and aside from some sex, there aren't too many similarities in any of the books to the films It is very odd, then, that this first incarnation of Bond is the closest Why they reversed their nationalities is probably because the show was made for American television but it is disconcerting seeing him played by Barry Nelson--a man without a hint of a British accent.

As for Nelson, he was a solid square-jawed sort of guy Yet, despite these many differences, it IS the closest version to the books. Even though the recent James Craig version is the closest of the movies to the original stories, it is still not as close to the story as this show from "Climax!

The show, like the book, is set almost entirely within a casino and the mission is for Bond to bankrupt a vicious Communist agent, Le Chiffre.

But this Le Chiffre is played by a chubby Peter Lorre and the action is rather muted. Because of this, the film seems more stagy and less exciting--but that WAS the book.

The only huge changes I resented in the TV version is that Bond lacked the cynicism and misogynistic outlook he developed by the end of the novel.

Overall, this is a curious oddity that probably will bore most Bond fans, but readers will appreciate. It's only 50 minutes long and is worth a look regardless.

You may know the man and you may know the story, but have you ever seen the first ever James Bond motion picture?

Technically, this hour-long made-for-TV feature is the first time Bond was adapted for a medium outside of the original novels. Despite that notoriety, this really isn't much to scream about.

Maybe it was exciting TV back in , but after the onslaught of bigger and more prolific James Bond pictures, this little feature has not aged well at all.

Even on its own merits, the film offers a small smattering of struggles and thrills, but it's all really small-scale, bland, and not that exciting.

This is also a rather lame adaptation of Ian Flemming's book. At its core, the film uses a very simple structure: Bond enters casino, plays off against Le Chiffre, gets tortured, fights his way out, and that's it.

In both the novel and film, there is a lot more to it; both represented a more pronounced introduction or re-introduction for the '06 film for the iconic character, it marked the first encounter between Bond and SMERSH, and he has a significant relationship that would give the story more weight and mold him for future stories.

None of that carries through in this version. There are many small changes and a lot of huge cuts to the story, which trims this whole affair down to something barebones, shallow, and flimsy.

Among the various changes, James Bond is made into an American dude named Jimmy, Felix is renamed to Clarence for some reason, Vesper Lynd is nowhere to be seen, and is replaced by a female Mathis.

Worst of all, none of these people have any ounce of presence or charisma. Yeah, at its best is just simple-minded throwaway entertainment; at its worst, it's a mess.

The film naturally doesn't have much of a style to it, given its limitations as a TV production. Filming and editing are straightforward, if not rather bland.

Acting is a hit and a miss; Barry Nelson is easily the worst actor to play Bond in the history of Bond, but he does have a few unintentionally funny lines.

Peter Lorre, on the other hand, is effective as Le Chiffre. Nobody else really stands out much. This production uses simple sets, props, and costumes.

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